How To Hold On To Your CDL

How secure is your Commercial Drivers License (CDL)? Are you aware of all the rules and regulations that go along with having a CDL? Although the changes in the law happened almost 8 years ago, I think it could be beneficial to everyone to refresh on what responsibilities you have to avoid losing your CDL. After all, no CDL means no more ready mix job.

Crazy as it may seem, you don’t have to have a traffic violation strictly in a commercial vehicle to lose your license. There are violations you can have in your personal vehicle that can result in disqualification of an individual’s CDL. For example, any of these offenses – in any vehicle- may result in disqualification:

Being under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol

  • Refusing an alcohol test
  • Leaving the scene of an accident
  • Using a vehicle to commit a felony

The following comes directly from http://www.dmv.org/ia-iowa/cdl-faqs.php :

What happens if I get a traffic ticket?

The standards for drivers holding a commercial license are higher than for those who have regular driver’s licenses. Therefore, there are often additional consequences for commercial drivers who are convicted of traffic violations.

If you are convicted of a traffic violation such as speeding, you must notify your employer within 30 days of your conviction. If your conviction occurred in another state, you must also notify the Office of Driver Services by mail at this address:

Office of Driver Services

Iowa Department of Transportation
Park Fair Mall
P.O. Box 9204
Des Moines, IA50306-9204

Note that these rules apply even if you were driving your personal, noncommercial vehicle at the time of the offense.

According to Iowa law, a driver can lose his commercial driving privileges if he is convicted of reckless driving, improper lane change, following too closely, or speeding 15 mph or more over the posted limit while operating a commercial vehicle. Two offenses within a three-year period will result in a 60-day suspension, while three offenses will earn a 120-day suspension.

So to conclude, you have a responsibility at work and also outside of work to drive like a professional. Failure to do so could not only affect you, but your family’s livelihood as well.